BYU

Abstract by Mylan Cook

Personal Infomation


Presenter's Name

Mylan Cook

Co-Presenters

None

Degree Level

Masters

Co-Authors

None

Abstract Infomation


Department

Physics and Astronomy

Faculty Advisor

Kent Gee

Title

The effects of contaminating noise on the calculation of active acoustic intensity

Abstract

Active acoustic intensity is a measure of how acoustic energy propagates.  There are different methods used to calculate this.  The traditional method uses the real and imaginary parts of complex pressure, while the Phase and Amplitude Gradient Estimator (PAGE) method uses the amplitude and phase of the complex pressure.  The results obtained from processing often differ from what is known to be physically happening, and so yield a bias error.  These bias errors can depend on many variables, including the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), frequency, source properties, incidence angles, probe configuration, and processing method.  The PAGE method is generally found to give more accurate results, though uncorrelated noise with a low SNR can lead to larger errors.  Additionally, the PAGE method can be used for higher frequencies than the traditional method.